Plastisol Coating

Plastisol coating is the most popular method of covering manufactured components using dip molding or dip coating. The combination of resin and plasticizer that forms plastisol is ideal for the process as it melts easily and is a liquid at room temperature, allowing for ease of process without requiring extra heat.

Wire racks, playground equipment, exercise equipment, tool handles, gas pump handles, fences and grating are all often coated in plastisol using the dip coating method.

Plastisol is a highly viscous material and adds an attractive and smooth finish to products. Plastisol can be used to coat metals, even galvanized metals, glass and ceramics and plastics which are able to withstand the heating portions of the dip coating process. Plastic coating an object improves its noise reducing and vibration dampening properties, adds excellent thermal and electrical insulation and eliminates the needs for deburring as it reduces sharp edges on metal parts.

Coating around wires and fences improves the corrosion resistance of the material and extends its lifespan, especially when used outside. Dip coating is not limited by shape or size, and while standard colors of plastisol include green, orange and black, plastic can be manufactured to match almost any color desired, making plastisol coating a versatile and useful process.

Precision Dip Coating High Dielectric Plastisol Coating
Plastisol Coating – Precision Dip Coating LLC

The process of dip coating with plastisol is a three-step thermal process. Components are cleaned and preheated before immersion. In some cases a primer is applied to the component surface in order to achieve permanent fusion between the plastisol mold and the part. However, if the coating is designed to be able to be slipped off the object at some stage, then no primer is necessary.

Dip coating then immerse the object into the plastisol mixture until the desired coverage point. The material gels around the heated part and adheres to the surface in a uniform manner. A range of wall thickness is achievable through using controlled temperature, dip speed and time and the rate at which a piece is removed from the plastisol. When removing an object from the plastisol, it should be done at a controlled rate to maintain surface smoothness. Further finishing can be achieved in the curing stage in which the coated part is heated in an oven to fuse the coating.

Dip coating is a popular coating method because it is simple, has low labor costs due to the machinery used and is cost-effective. There is minimal material wastage in this process as products are dipped into the plastisol and only use as much material as is required. There is also no need for secondary finishing after the plastisol coating has been applied which further reduces manufacturing costs.

Plastisol Coating Informational Video